THE DISPLACEMENT
THE DISPLACEMENT A Movement in Three Acts
-This is a compilation of documents, films, books, images and diverse material for the ongoing project The Displacement.

Marx-Engels-Forum is a public park in the central Mitte district of Berlin. The park was created by the authorities of the former German Democratic Republic in 1986. It consists of a rectangular wooded park with a large, circular paved area in the centre with a sculpture consisting of larger-than-life bronze figures of Karl Marx (sitting) and Friedrich Engels (standing), the founders of the Communist movement.

The sculpture was moved a few meters in 2010 because of the construction of the subway. This is the physical displacement to which I refer in the title. But the sculpture not only moved from its original position, neither Marx and Engels look to the Alexanderplatz as usual, but the figures see for the first time the area where stood the Palace of the Republic and now stands a temporary building of futuristic ambition, promoting and raising money for the reconstruction of the prussian Royal Palace.

It is an ideological battleground where the spatial speculation consist in the domain of the symbols. Here each element has a symbolic importance as perhaps nowhere else in Europe and every gesture can be looked as a sign, symptom and pathology of the current crisis of the totalitarian capitalism.

The Displacement consists of three works around the figures of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels with which I propose a second conceptual displacement, another representational turn where visualize how large political-historical processes affecting seemingly intimate and private sphere of the people: in their affections, pleasures and sexual desires..

Act One: Romantic Love as a Fictional Narrative. )

Act Two: Subject of Desire and its Rituals of Administration.)

Act Three: Prostitution and the Dominination of Gratification.
THE DISPLACEMENT
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Sexwork
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Rethinking sex and gender - Christine Delphy
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Rosa Luxemburg memorial at the site where she was thrown—either dead or alive—into the Landwehrkanal, Berlin.
Photo: Connie Mendoza, 2014
Luxemburg’s last known words, written on the evening of her murder, were about her belief in the masses, and in what she saw as the inevitability of revolution:
"The leadership has failed. Even so, the leadership can and must be recreated from the masses and out of the masses. The masses are the decisive element, they are the rock on which the final victory of the revolution will be built. The masses were on the heights; they have developed this ‘defeat’ into one of the historical defeats which are the pride and strength of international socialism. And that is why the future victory will bloom from this ‘defeat’. ‘Order reigns in Berlin!’ You stupid henchmen! Your ‘order’ is built on sand. Tomorrow the revolution will already ‘raise itself with a rattle’ and announce with fanfare, to your terror: I was, I am, I shall be!”
Rosa Luxemburg memorial at the site where she was thrown—either dead or alive—into the Landwehrkanal, Berlin.
Photo: Connie Mendoza, 2014
Luxemburg’s last known words, written on the evening of her murder, were about her belief in the masses, and in what she saw as the inevitability of revolution:
"The leadership has failed. Even so, the leadership can and must be recreated from the masses and out of the masses. The masses are the decisive element, they are the rock on which the final victory of the revolution will be built. The masses were on the heights; they have developed this ‘defeat’ into one of the historical defeats which are the pride and strength of international socialism. And that is why the future victory will bloom from this ‘defeat’. ‘Order reigns in Berlin!’ You stupid henchmen! Your ‘order’ is built on sand. Tomorrow the revolution will already ‘raise itself with a rattle’ and announce with fanfare, to your terror: I was, I am, I shall be!”
Rosa Luxemburg memorial at the site where she was thrown—either dead or alive—into the Landwehrkanal, Berlin.
Photo: Connie Mendoza, 2014
Luxemburg’s last known words, written on the evening of her murder, were about her belief in the masses, and in what she saw as the inevitability of revolution:
"The leadership has failed. Even so, the leadership can and must be recreated from the masses and out of the masses. The masses are the decisive element, they are the rock on which the final victory of the revolution will be built. The masses were on the heights; they have developed this ‘defeat’ into one of the historical defeats which are the pride and strength of international socialism. And that is why the future victory will bloom from this ‘defeat’. ‘Order reigns in Berlin!’ You stupid henchmen! Your ‘order’ is built on sand. Tomorrow the revolution will already ‘raise itself with a rattle’ and announce with fanfare, to your terror: I was, I am, I shall be!”
Rosa Luxemburg memorial at the site where she was thrown—either dead or alive—into the Landwehrkanal, Berlin.
Photo: Connie Mendoza, 2014
Luxemburg’s last known words, written on the evening of her murder, were about her belief in the masses, and in what she saw as the inevitability of revolution:
"The leadership has failed. Even so, the leadership can and must be recreated from the masses and out of the masses. The masses are the decisive element, they are the rock on which the final victory of the revolution will be built. The masses were on the heights; they have developed this ‘defeat’ into one of the historical defeats which are the pride and strength of international socialism. And that is why the future victory will bloom from this ‘defeat’. ‘Order reigns in Berlin!’ You stupid henchmen! Your ‘order’ is built on sand. Tomorrow the revolution will already ‘raise itself with a rattle’ and announce with fanfare, to your terror: I was, I am, I shall be!”
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Tagebuch der Sekretäre W. I. Lenins
21. November bis 6. März 1965
Dietz Verlag. Berlin 1965
The Displacement, Connie Mendoza, 2014
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Jenny Marx in Briefenan einer vertraute Freundin.
Verlag für die Frauen. Leipzig, 1989
The Displacement. Connie Mendoza, 2014
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The Uprising: On Poetry and Finance. “Bifo” Berardi
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To Have Done with the Massacre of the Body by Félix Guattari
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Film Poster ” Die Prostitution” 1919, design, J. Fenneker, ill. 88 in Rita Täuber, Der häßliche Eros (Berlin, Mann, 1997).
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"Women, Resistence and Revolution. A hitoru of Women and Revolution in the Modern World" by Sheila Rowbotham
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Exercise from Albers preliminary course 1928 involving a copy of “die Rote Fahne” chief organ of the kpd and the “Berliner Tageblatt”